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The Otherness of a Barbarianess: Euripides’ ‘Medea’ and ‘Medea’ by Velimir Lukić

dc.contributorЂорђевић Црнобрња, Јадранка
dc.creatorШијаковић, Ђурђина
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-21T11:38:55Z
dc.date.available2020-04-21T11:38:55Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn0350-0861 (print)
dc.identifier.issn2334-8259 (online)
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.ei.sanu.ac.rs/index.php/gei/article/view/316/257
dc.identifier.urihttp://dais.sanu.ac.rs/123456789/8215
dc.description.abstractОвај рад нуди читање двије драме: Еурипидове (око 480–406 пр. Хр.) трагедије Медеја и радио- драме Медеја, Велимира Лукића (1936–1937). Најприје су сагледана два нивоа поларитета сопство : другост у класичној грчкој мисли; то су дихотомије Грк : варварин и дихотомија родне перспективе. Затим су анализиране драме, са фокусом на овом поларитету. Еурипидова Медеја је опасна странкиња и пријетња мушком принципу; она је радикална другост у односу на грчко сопство. У Лукићевој Медеји се супротстављају вјечно и промјенљиво, мушко и женско, а јаз који зјапи између хеленског и варварског свијета бива у крупном плану.sr
dc.description.abstractBearing this dichotomy in mind, I am re-reading two theatric plays: Euripides’ (cca 480–406 BC) tragedy Medea and radio-drama Medea of Serbian writer Velimir Lukić (1936–1937), one of many literary and art-works inspired by Euripides’ tragedy and Greek myth. Euripides’ Medea influenced on the tradition of this famous barbarian woman from Colchis, passionate and cruel sorceress, more than any other text did. If this writer didn’t make up Medea’s infanticide (performed in order to punish her unfaithful husband) on his own, then it was him who gave a fixed form to this variant of the myth. She is a refugee from her own home and country, a newcomer in Greece on the other side; she is a dangerous foreigner, a barbarian, passionate woman and sorceress; a threat and an ill omen to the manliness and male principle (and ambiguously a potential help to it). In order to avenge to her infidel husband, Greek Jason, this Colchian woman becomes a murderer of her own (two male!) children in the Euripides’ tragedy. The bloody epilogue of love between Greek and Colchian is described by Velimir Lukić as well. In his radio-drama Medea, eternal and varible, male and female, Greek and barbarian (in a particular aspect) are juxtaposed. Lukić constantly has in mind an abyss that gapes between hellenic and barbarian world, a gap that (in his interpretation) is so terrific that Medea will murder her own offspring saying: „So that I prevent my sons from becoming Greek, / To prevent them to reject their barbarian mother…”en
dc.language.isosrsr
dc.publisherБеоград : Етнографски институт САНУ / Belgrade : Institute of Ethnography SASAsr
dc.relationinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/MESTD/Basic Research (BR or ON)/177028/RS//sr
dc.rightsopenAccesssr
dc.sourceГласник Етнографског института САНУ / Bulletin of the Institute of Ethnography SASA
dc.subjectхеленствоsr
dc.subjectварварствоsr
dc.subjectграђанин полисаsr
dc.subjectженаsr
dc.subjectсопствоsr
dc.subjectдругостsr
dc.subjectМедејаsr
dc.subjectЕурипид (око 480–406 пр. Хр.)sr
dc.subjectGreeksr
dc.subjectbarbariansr
dc.subjectcitizen of a polissr
dc.subjectwomansr
dc.subjectselfsr
dc.subjectothersr
dc.subjectMedeasr
dc.subjectEuripides (cca 480–406 BC)sr
dc.subjectVelimir Lukić (1936–1937)sr
dc.titleДругост варварке: ‘Медеја’ Еурипидова и ‘Медеја’ Велимира Лукићаsr
dc.titleThe Otherness of a Barbarianess: Euripides’ ‘Medea’ and ‘Medea’ by Velimir Lukićen
dc.typearticlesr
dc.rights.licenseBY-NC-NDsr
dc.rights.holderЕтнографски институт САНУsr
dc.citation.spage181
dc.citation.epage200
dc.citation.volume62
dc.citation.issue2
dc.identifier.doi10.2298/GEI1402181S
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionsr
dc.identifier.fulltexthttp://dais.sanu.ac.rs/bitstream/id/31562/bitstream_31562.pdf


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