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dc.creatorSfetas, Spyridon
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-09T13:20:50Z
dc.date.available2018-11-09T13:20:50Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.issn0350-7653
dc.identifier.urihttp://dais.sanu.ac.rs/123456789/4327
dc.description.abstractTito's visit to Greece contributed to the Balkan Pact's transformation into a military alliance. Despite the establishment of Soviet-Yugoslav diplomatic relations in 1953, the Soviet Union made no political move towards normalizing bilateral relations. For security reasons Tito visited Athens (June 1954) to promote Yugoslavia's military cooperation with Greece and Turkey without ruling out Yugoslavia's accession to NATO. But the Soviet leadership, fearing Yugoslavia's involvement in western defense mechanisms, sent the message to Belgrade that it was ready to recognize Stalin's blunders towards Yugoslavia. Thus, Tito applied a policy of equidistance between East and West and refused to link up the Balkan Alliance with NATO.en
dc.publisherBelgrade : Institute for Balkan Studies, Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts
dc.rightsopenAccess
dc.sourceBalcanica
dc.subjectYugoslaviaen
dc.subjectGreeceen
dc.subjectBalkan Pacten
dc.subjectNATOen
dc.subjectTurkeyen
dc.subjectSoviet Unionen
dc.subjectTito' visit to Athensen
dc.subjectBulgarian attitudeen
dc.titleFrom Ankara to Bled Marshal Tito's Visit to Greece (June 1954) and the Formation of the Balkan Allianceen
dc.typearticle
dc.rights.licenseBY-NC-SA
dcterms.abstractСфетас, Спyридон;
dc.citation.spage133
dc.citation.epage163
dc.citation.issueXLII
dc.identifier.doi10.2298/BALC1142133S
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionen
dc.identifier.fulltexthttp://dais.sanu.ac.rs/bitstream/id/21276/4438.pdf
dc.citation.other(42): 133-163


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