Vranješ Đurić, Sanja

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orcid::0000-0002-6340-2387
  • Vranješ Đurić, Sanja (6)
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Author's Bibliography

Subchapter 1.4: Radiolabeled functional nanoparticles in preventive and regenerative medicine

Vranješ Đurić, Sanja; Ignjatović, Nenad

(Elsevier, 2018)

TY  - CHAP
AU  - Vranješ Đurić, Sanja
AU  - Ignjatović, Nenad
PY  - 2018
AB  - Nuclear medicine is a branch of medicine that uses radiation to provide infor¬mation about the functioning of a person’s specific tissue/organs or to treat a disease. Radiolabeled nanoparticles (NPs) represent a new class of agents with a great potential for nuclear medicine applications. The key advantage of using radiolabeled NPs is that a very small amount can be used to obtain information of great importance.1 They may be used to detect and characterize disease, to deliver relevant therapeutics, and to monitor the therapeutic effect as well. Furthermore radiotracer-based imaging either using single-photon emission computed tomog¬raphy (SPECT) or positron emission tomography (PET) is particularly suited in the study of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic parameters of nanomaterials and determination of their optimal nanodimensional architecture for tissue/organ re¬generation. Measuring radiation from radioactive tracers attached to NPs has been demonstrated to be a highly sensitive and specific method that allows accurate quantification, without limits to tissue penetration in any organ. Nuclear imaging approaches are highly suitable for detection, as they offer a high detection sensitiv¬ity at high temporal and spatial resolutions, requiring a radionuclide concentration of around 10−10 M at the site of interest.Nanoparticulate agents typically demonstrate pharmacokinetic behavior differ¬ent from that of small molecules2 and provide flexible platforms for integration of multiple functional entities, including targeting ligands, multiple types of contrast materials, and/or therapeutics. In contrast to traditional compounds used for radio¬pharmaceutical preparation, nanomaterials have an immense available surface area per unit of volume and tunable optical, electronic, magnetic, and biological proper¬ties. Generally, they can be tailored to meet the needs of specific applications and engineered to have different physicochemical properties that affect in vivo biodis¬tribution: sizes, shapes, chemical compositions, surface chemical characteristics, and hollow or solid structures.3 Efficient diagnosis/radiotherapy is provided through passive targeting based on the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect and/or active targeting through the incorporation of a targeting moiety on an NP. Nontargeted NPs can accumulate in tumors, as the tumor vasculature is usually leaky and without lymphatic drainage. Active targeting is achieved by functionalizing the NPs surface with suitable vectors, including peptides, antibodies, and other biomolecules, which recognize characteristic epitopes at the surface of the diseased cells.
Radiolabeled antibodies may effectively target even single cancer cells in circula¬tion5 or small cancer cell clusters,6 thereby enabling a more specific radiation dose delivery, preventing damage to healthy tissues.
PB  - Elsevier
T2  - Nanotechnologies in Preventive and Regenerative Medicine:  An Emerging Big Picture
T1  - Subchapter 1.4: Radiolabeled functional nanoparticles in preventive and regenerative medicine
SP  - 65
EP  - 92
VL  - (2018)
DO  - 10.1016/B978-0-323-48063-5.00001-0
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Vranješ Đurić, Sanja and Ignjatović, Nenad",
year = "2018",
abstract = "Nuclear medicine is a branch of medicine that uses radiation to provide infor¬mation about the functioning of a person’s specific tissue/organs or to treat a disease. Radiolabeled nanoparticles (NPs) represent a new class of agents with a great potential for nuclear medicine applications. The key advantage of using radiolabeled NPs is that a very small amount can be used to obtain information of great importance.1 They may be used to detect and characterize disease, to deliver relevant therapeutics, and to monitor the therapeutic effect as well. Furthermore radiotracer-based imaging either using single-photon emission computed tomog¬raphy (SPECT) or positron emission tomography (PET) is particularly suited in the study of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic parameters of nanomaterials and determination of their optimal nanodimensional architecture for tissue/organ re¬generation. Measuring radiation from radioactive tracers attached to NPs has been demonstrated to be a highly sensitive and specific method that allows accurate quantification, without limits to tissue penetration in any organ. Nuclear imaging approaches are highly suitable for detection, as they offer a high detection sensitiv¬ity at high temporal and spatial resolutions, requiring a radionuclide concentration of around 10−10 M at the site of interest.Nanoparticulate agents typically demonstrate pharmacokinetic behavior differ¬ent from that of small molecules2 and provide flexible platforms for integration of multiple functional entities, including targeting ligands, multiple types of contrast materials, and/or therapeutics. In contrast to traditional compounds used for radio¬pharmaceutical preparation, nanomaterials have an immense available surface area per unit of volume and tunable optical, electronic, magnetic, and biological proper¬ties. Generally, they can be tailored to meet the needs of specific applications and engineered to have different physicochemical properties that affect in vivo biodis¬tribution: sizes, shapes, chemical compositions, surface chemical characteristics, and hollow or solid structures.3 Efficient diagnosis/radiotherapy is provided through passive targeting based on the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect and/or active targeting through the incorporation of a targeting moiety on an NP. Nontargeted NPs can accumulate in tumors, as the tumor vasculature is usually leaky and without lymphatic drainage. Active targeting is achieved by functionalizing the NPs surface with suitable vectors, including peptides, antibodies, and other biomolecules, which recognize characteristic epitopes at the surface of the diseased cells.
Radiolabeled antibodies may effectively target even single cancer cells in circula¬tion5 or small cancer cell clusters,6 thereby enabling a more specific radiation dose delivery, preventing damage to healthy tissues.",
publisher = "Elsevier",
journal = "Nanotechnologies in Preventive and Regenerative Medicine:  An Emerging Big Picture",
title = "Subchapter 1.4: Radiolabeled functional nanoparticles in preventive and regenerative medicine",
pages = "65-92",
volume = "(2018)",
doi = "10.1016/B978-0-323-48063-5.00001-0"
}
Vranješ Đurić, S.,& Ignjatović, N. (2018). Subchapter 1.4: Radiolabeled functional nanoparticles in preventive and regenerative medicine.
Nanotechnologies in Preventive and Regenerative Medicine:  An Emerging Big Picture
Elsevier., (2018), 65-92.
https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-323-48063-5.00001-0
Vranješ Đurić S, Ignjatović N. Subchapter 1.4: Radiolabeled functional nanoparticles in preventive and regenerative medicine. Nanotechnologies in Preventive and Regenerative Medicine:  An Emerging Big Picture. 2018;(2018):65-92.
doi:10.1016/B978-0-323-48063-5.00001-0.
Vranješ Đurić Sanja, Ignjatović Nenad, "Subchapter 1.4: Radiolabeled functional nanoparticles in preventive and regenerative medicine" Nanotechnologies in Preventive and Regenerative Medicine:  An Emerging Big Picture, (2018) (2018):65-92,
https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-323-48063-5.00001-0 .
10
2

Subchapter 1.4: Radiolabeled functional nanoparticles in preventive and regenerative medicine

Vranješ Đurić, Sanja; Ignjatović, Nenad

(Elsevier, 2018)

TY  - CHAP
AU  - Vranješ Đurić, Sanja
AU  - Ignjatović, Nenad
PY  - 2018
AB  - Nuclear medicine is a branch of medicine that uses radiation to provide infor¬mation about the functioning of a person’s specific tissue/organs or to treat a disease. Radiolabeled nanoparticles (NPs) represent a new class of agents with a great potential for nuclear medicine applications. The key advantage of using radiolabeled NPs is that a very small amount can be used to obtain information of great importance.1 They may be used to detect and characterize disease, to deliver relevant therapeutics, and to monitor the therapeutic effect as well. Furthermore radiotracer-based imaging either using single-photon emission computed tomog¬raphy (SPECT) or positron emission tomography (PET) is particularly suited in the study of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic parameters of nanomaterials and determination of their optimal nanodimensional architecture for tissue/organ re¬generation. Measuring radiation from radioactive tracers attached to NPs has been demonstrated to be a highly sensitive and specific method that allows accurate quantification, without limits to tissue penetration in any organ. Nuclear imaging approaches are highly suitable for detection, as they offer a high detection sensitiv¬ity at high temporal and spatial resolutions, requiring a radionuclide concentration of around 10−10 M at the site of interest.Nanoparticulate agents typically demonstrate pharmacokinetic behavior differ¬ent from that of small molecules2 and provide flexible platforms for integration of multiple functional entities, including targeting ligands, multiple types of contrast materials, and/or therapeutics. In contrast to traditional compounds used for radio¬pharmaceutical preparation, nanomaterials have an immense available surface area per unit of volume and tunable optical, electronic, magnetic, and biological proper¬ties. Generally, they can be tailored to meet the needs of specific applications and engineered to have different physicochemical properties that affect in vivo biodis¬tribution: sizes, shapes, chemical compositions, surface chemical characteristics, and hollow or solid structures.3 Efficient diagnosis/radiotherapy is provided through passive targeting based on the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect and/or active targeting through the incorporation of a targeting moiety on an NP. Nontargeted NPs can accumulate in tumors, as the tumor vasculature is usually leaky and without lymphatic drainage. Active targeting is achieved by functionalizing the NPs surface with suitable vectors, including peptides, antibodies, and other biomolecules, which recognize characteristic epitopes at the surface of the diseased cells. Radiolabeled antibodies may effectively target even single cancer cells in circula¬tion5 or small cancer cell clusters,6 thereby enabling a more specific radiation dose delivery, preventing damage to healthy tissues.
PB  - Elsevier
T2  - Nanotechnologies in Preventive and Regenerative Medicine:  An Emerging Big Picture
T1  - Subchapter 1.4: Radiolabeled functional nanoparticles in preventive and regenerative medicine
SP  - 65
EP  - 92
DO  - 10.1016/B978-0-323-48063-5.00001-0
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Vranješ Đurić, Sanja and Ignjatović, Nenad",
year = "2018",
abstract = "Nuclear medicine is a branch of medicine that uses radiation to provide infor¬mation about the functioning of a person’s specific tissue/organs or to treat a disease. Radiolabeled nanoparticles (NPs) represent a new class of agents with a great potential for nuclear medicine applications. The key advantage of using radiolabeled NPs is that a very small amount can be used to obtain information of great importance.1 They may be used to detect and characterize disease, to deliver relevant therapeutics, and to monitor the therapeutic effect as well. Furthermore radiotracer-based imaging either using single-photon emission computed tomog¬raphy (SPECT) or positron emission tomography (PET) is particularly suited in the study of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic parameters of nanomaterials and determination of their optimal nanodimensional architecture for tissue/organ re¬generation. Measuring radiation from radioactive tracers attached to NPs has been demonstrated to be a highly sensitive and specific method that allows accurate quantification, without limits to tissue penetration in any organ. Nuclear imaging approaches are highly suitable for detection, as they offer a high detection sensitiv¬ity at high temporal and spatial resolutions, requiring a radionuclide concentration of around 10−10 M at the site of interest.Nanoparticulate agents typically demonstrate pharmacokinetic behavior differ¬ent from that of small molecules2 and provide flexible platforms for integration of multiple functional entities, including targeting ligands, multiple types of contrast materials, and/or therapeutics. In contrast to traditional compounds used for radio¬pharmaceutical preparation, nanomaterials have an immense available surface area per unit of volume and tunable optical, electronic, magnetic, and biological proper¬ties. Generally, they can be tailored to meet the needs of specific applications and engineered to have different physicochemical properties that affect in vivo biodis¬tribution: sizes, shapes, chemical compositions, surface chemical characteristics, and hollow or solid structures.3 Efficient diagnosis/radiotherapy is provided through passive targeting based on the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect and/or active targeting through the incorporation of a targeting moiety on an NP. Nontargeted NPs can accumulate in tumors, as the tumor vasculature is usually leaky and without lymphatic drainage. Active targeting is achieved by functionalizing the NPs surface with suitable vectors, including peptides, antibodies, and other biomolecules, which recognize characteristic epitopes at the surface of the diseased cells. Radiolabeled antibodies may effectively target even single cancer cells in circula¬tion5 or small cancer cell clusters,6 thereby enabling a more specific radiation dose delivery, preventing damage to healthy tissues.",
publisher = "Elsevier",
journal = "Nanotechnologies in Preventive and Regenerative Medicine:  An Emerging Big Picture",
title = "Subchapter 1.4: Radiolabeled functional nanoparticles in preventive and regenerative medicine",
pages = "65-92",
doi = "10.1016/B978-0-323-48063-5.00001-0"
}
Vranješ Đurić, S.,& Ignjatović, N. (2018). Subchapter 1.4: Radiolabeled functional nanoparticles in preventive and regenerative medicine.
Nanotechnologies in Preventive and Regenerative Medicine:  An Emerging Big Picture
Elsevier., 65-92.
https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-323-48063-5.00001-0
Vranješ Đurić S, Ignjatović N. Subchapter 1.4: Radiolabeled functional nanoparticles in preventive and regenerative medicine. Nanotechnologies in Preventive and Regenerative Medicine:  An Emerging Big Picture. 2018;:65-92.
doi:10.1016/B978-0-323-48063-5.00001-0.
Vranješ Đurić Sanja, Ignjatović Nenad, "Subchapter 1.4: Radiolabeled functional nanoparticles in preventive and regenerative medicine" Nanotechnologies in Preventive and Regenerative Medicine:  An Emerging Big Picture (2018):65-92,
https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-323-48063-5.00001-0 .
11
2

The success rate of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles coated with bioresorbable polymers in a biological environment

Ignjatović, Nenad; Ajduković, Zorica; Vranješ Đurić, Sanja; Uskoković, Dragan

(Belgrade : Materials Research Society of Serbia, 2014)

TY  - CONF
AU  - Ignjatović, Nenad
AU  - Ajduković, Zorica
AU  - Vranješ Đurić, Sanja
AU  - Uskoković, Dragan
PY  - 2014
AB  - Hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanoparticles coated with bioresorbable polymers have been successfully used as filler, carriers of antibiotics, vitamins and stem cells in bone tissue engineering. Interactions in the microenvironment of nanoparticulate hydroxyapatites and tissues are of a particular interest and present a challenge in regenerative medicine. The phenomena that influence the success of targeting and controlled operation or therapeutic nanosystems are numerous and complex: size, shape, surface charge, functional groups of nanoparticles, electrical double-layer formation, zeta potential, partial molar free energy, sorption molar free energy, isoelectric point of solid–liquid interface; receptor–ligand binding interactions of nano-bio interface etc. In our studies we present the synthesis, characterization, in vitro and in vivo research of nanoparticulate form of HAp-coated polymers systems. Synthesized nanoparticulate HAp coated with different types of bioresorbable polymers: poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide), chitozan and other similar by the solvent/non-solvent method. The physical and chemical analyses have confirmed that HAp particles are coated with bioresorbable polymers. Results of spectroscopic analysis suggests formation of hydrogen bonds between the surface groups of HAp and =O and –H groups in the polymer chain from bioresorbable polymers. By adding nanoparticulate HAp in the polymer matrix was achieved the changes in the partial molar free energy and sorption molar free energy of the system. In vitro results showed satisfactory biocompatibility of nanoparticulate HAp-coated polymers systems. The use of these systems in the form of filler was achieved a high quality osteogenesis in reconstruction of bone tissue, in vivo.The biodistribution of 125I-labeled HAp particles after intravenous injection in rats showed the potential use of these materials as a organ-targeting system: uncoated-HAp mostly targeted the liver, coated-HAp spleen and lungs.
PB  - Belgrade : Materials Research Society of Serbia
C3  - The Sixteenth Annual Conference YUCOMAT 2014: Programme and the Book of Abstracts
T1  - The success rate of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles coated with bioresorbable polymers in a biological environment
SP  - 40
EP  - 40
ER  - 
@conference{
author = "Ignjatović, Nenad and Ajduković, Zorica and Vranješ Đurić, Sanja and Uskoković, Dragan",
year = "2014",
abstract = "Hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanoparticles coated with bioresorbable polymers have been successfully used as filler, carriers of antibiotics, vitamins and stem cells in bone tissue engineering. Interactions in the microenvironment of nanoparticulate hydroxyapatites and tissues are of a particular interest and present a challenge in regenerative medicine. The phenomena that influence the success of targeting and controlled operation or therapeutic nanosystems are numerous and complex: size, shape, surface charge, functional groups of nanoparticles, electrical double-layer formation, zeta potential, partial molar free energy, sorption molar free energy, isoelectric point of solid–liquid interface; receptor–ligand binding interactions of nano-bio interface etc. In our studies we present the synthesis, characterization, in vitro and in vivo research of nanoparticulate form of HAp-coated polymers systems. Synthesized nanoparticulate HAp coated with different types of bioresorbable polymers: poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide), chitozan and other similar by the solvent/non-solvent method. The physical and chemical analyses have confirmed that HAp particles are coated with bioresorbable polymers. Results of spectroscopic analysis suggests formation of hydrogen bonds between the surface groups of HAp and =O and –H groups in the polymer chain from bioresorbable polymers. By adding nanoparticulate HAp in the polymer matrix was achieved the changes in the partial molar free energy and sorption molar free energy of the system. In vitro results showed satisfactory biocompatibility of nanoparticulate HAp-coated polymers systems. The use of these systems in the form of filler was achieved a high quality osteogenesis in reconstruction of bone tissue, in vivo.The biodistribution of 125I-labeled HAp particles after intravenous injection in rats showed the potential use of these materials as a organ-targeting system: uncoated-HAp mostly targeted the liver, coated-HAp spleen and lungs.",
publisher = "Belgrade : Materials Research Society of Serbia",
journal = "The Sixteenth Annual Conference YUCOMAT 2014: Programme and the Book of Abstracts",
title = "The success rate of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles coated with bioresorbable polymers in a biological environment",
pages = "40-40"
}
Ignjatović, N., Ajduković, Z., Vranješ Đurić, S.,& Uskoković, D. (2014). The success rate of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles coated with bioresorbable polymers in a biological environment.
The Sixteenth Annual Conference YUCOMAT 2014: Programme and the Book of Abstracts
Belgrade : Materials Research Society of Serbia., 40-40.
Ignjatović N, Ajduković Z, Vranješ Đurić S, Uskoković D. The success rate of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles coated with bioresorbable polymers in a biological environment. The Sixteenth Annual Conference YUCOMAT 2014: Programme and the Book of Abstracts. 2014;:40-40.
Ignjatović Nenad, Ajduković Zorica, Vranješ Đurić Sanja, Uskoković Dragan, "The success rate of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles coated with bioresorbable polymers in a biological environment" The Sixteenth Annual Conference YUCOMAT 2014: Programme and the Book of Abstracts (2014):40-40

Investigating an organ-targeting platform based on hydroxyapatite nanoparticles using a novel in situ method of radioactive 125Iodine labeling

Ignjatović, Nenad; Vranješ Đurić, Sanja; Mitić, Žarko; Janković, Drina; Uskoković, Dragan

(Elsevier, 2014)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Ignjatović, Nenad
AU  - Vranješ Đurić, Sanja
AU  - Mitić, Žarko
AU  - Janković, Drina
AU  - Uskoković, Dragan
PY  - 2014
AB  - In this study, we have investigated the synthesis of nanoparticles of hydroxyapatite (HAp) and hydroxyapatite coated with chitosan (HAp/Ch) and the chitosan-poly-d,l-lactide-co-glycolide polymer blend (HAp/Ch-PLGA) as an organ-targeting system. We have examined and defined the final destination, as well as the dynamics and the pathways of the synthesized particles following intravenous administration in vivo.

The XRD, ZP, FT-IR and SEM analyses have confirmed that the hydroxyapatite nanoparticles with d50 = 72 nm are coated with polymers. Radioactive 125-Iodine (125I), a low energy gamma emitter, was used to develop a novel in situ method for the radiolabeling of particles and investigation of their biodistribution. 125I-labeled particles exhibited high stability in saline and serum over the second day, which justified their use in the following in vivo studies.

The biodistribution of 125I-labeled particles after intravenous injection in rats differed significantly: HAp particles mostly targeted the liver, HAp/Ch the spleen and the liver, while HAp/Ch-PLGA targeted the lungs. Twenty-four hours post injection, HAp particles were excreted completely, while both 125I-HAp/Ch and 125I-HAp/Ch-PLGA were retained in the body for a prolonged period of time with more than 20% of radioactivity still found in different organs.
PB  - Elsevier
T2  - Materials Science and Engineering C
T1  - Investigating an organ-targeting platform based on hydroxyapatite nanoparticles using a novel in situ method of radioactive 125Iodine labeling
SP  - 439
EP  - 446
VL  - 43
DO  - 10.1016/j.msec.2014.07.046
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Ignjatović, Nenad and Vranješ Đurić, Sanja and Mitić, Žarko and Janković, Drina and Uskoković, Dragan",
year = "2014",
abstract = "In this study, we have investigated the synthesis of nanoparticles of hydroxyapatite (HAp) and hydroxyapatite coated with chitosan (HAp/Ch) and the chitosan-poly-d,l-lactide-co-glycolide polymer blend (HAp/Ch-PLGA) as an organ-targeting system. We have examined and defined the final destination, as well as the dynamics and the pathways of the synthesized particles following intravenous administration in vivo.

The XRD, ZP, FT-IR and SEM analyses have confirmed that the hydroxyapatite nanoparticles with d50 = 72 nm are coated with polymers. Radioactive 125-Iodine (125I), a low energy gamma emitter, was used to develop a novel in situ method for the radiolabeling of particles and investigation of their biodistribution. 125I-labeled particles exhibited high stability in saline and serum over the second day, which justified their use in the following in vivo studies.

The biodistribution of 125I-labeled particles after intravenous injection in rats differed significantly: HAp particles mostly targeted the liver, HAp/Ch the spleen and the liver, while HAp/Ch-PLGA targeted the lungs. Twenty-four hours post injection, HAp particles were excreted completely, while both 125I-HAp/Ch and 125I-HAp/Ch-PLGA were retained in the body for a prolonged period of time with more than 20% of radioactivity still found in different organs.",
publisher = "Elsevier",
journal = "Materials Science and Engineering C",
title = "Investigating an organ-targeting platform based on hydroxyapatite nanoparticles using a novel in situ method of radioactive 125Iodine labeling",
pages = "439-446",
volume = "43",
doi = "10.1016/j.msec.2014.07.046"
}
Ignjatović, N., Vranješ Đurić, S., Mitić, Ž., Janković, D.,& Uskoković, D. (2014). Investigating an organ-targeting platform based on hydroxyapatite nanoparticles using a novel in situ method of radioactive 125Iodine labeling.
Materials Science and Engineering C
Elsevier., 43, 439-446.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.msec.2014.07.046
Ignjatović N, Vranješ Đurić S, Mitić Ž, Janković D, Uskoković D. Investigating an organ-targeting platform based on hydroxyapatite nanoparticles using a novel in situ method of radioactive 125Iodine labeling. Materials Science and Engineering C. 2014;43:439-446.
doi:10.1016/j.msec.2014.07.046.
Ignjatović Nenad, Vranješ Đurić Sanja, Mitić Žarko, Janković Drina, Uskoković Dragan, "Investigating an organ-targeting platform based on hydroxyapatite nanoparticles using a novel in situ method of radioactive 125Iodine labeling" Materials Science and Engineering C, 43 (2014):439-446,
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.msec.2014.07.046 .
31
27
33

Investigating an organ-targeting platform based on hydroxyapatite nanoparticles using a novel in situ method of radioactive 125Iodine labeling

Ignjatović, Nenad; Vranješ Đurić, Sanja; Mitić, Žarko; Janković, Drina; Uskoković, Dragan

(Elsevier, 2014)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Ignjatović, Nenad
AU  - Vranješ Đurić, Sanja
AU  - Mitić, Žarko
AU  - Janković, Drina
AU  - Uskoković, Dragan
PY  - 2014
AB  - In this study, we have investigated the synthesis of nanoparticles of hydroxyapatite (HAp) and hydroxyapatite coated with chitosan (HAp/Ch) and the chitosan-poly-d,l-lactide-co-glycolide polymer blend (HAp/Ch-PLGA) as an organ-targeting system. We have examined and defined the final destination, as well as the dynamics and the pathways of the synthesized particles following intravenous administration in vivo.

The XRD, ZP, FT-IR and SEM analyses have confirmed that the hydroxyapatite nanoparticles with d50 = 72 nm are coated with polymers. Radioactive 125-Iodine (125I), a low energy gamma emitter, was used to develop a novel in situ method for the radiolabeling of particles and investigation of their biodistribution. 125I-labeled particles exhibited high stability in saline and serum over the second day, which justified their use in the following in vivo studies.

The biodistribution of 125I-labeled particles after intravenous injection in rats differed significantly: HAp particles mostly targeted the liver, HAp/Ch the spleen and the liver, while HAp/Ch-PLGA targeted the lungs. Twenty-four hours post injection, HAp particles were excreted completely, while both 125I-HAp/Ch and 125I-HAp/Ch-PLGA were retained in the body for a prolonged period of time with more than 20% of radioactivity still found in different organs.
PB  - Elsevier
T2  - Materials Science and Engineering: C
T1  - Investigating an organ-targeting platform based on hydroxyapatite nanoparticles using a novel in situ method of radioactive 125Iodine labeling
SP  - 439
EP  - 436
VL  - 43
DO  - 10.1016/j.msec.2014.07.046
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Ignjatović, Nenad and Vranješ Đurić, Sanja and Mitić, Žarko and Janković, Drina and Uskoković, Dragan",
year = "2014",
abstract = "In this study, we have investigated the synthesis of nanoparticles of hydroxyapatite (HAp) and hydroxyapatite coated with chitosan (HAp/Ch) and the chitosan-poly-d,l-lactide-co-glycolide polymer blend (HAp/Ch-PLGA) as an organ-targeting system. We have examined and defined the final destination, as well as the dynamics and the pathways of the synthesized particles following intravenous administration in vivo.

The XRD, ZP, FT-IR and SEM analyses have confirmed that the hydroxyapatite nanoparticles with d50 = 72 nm are coated with polymers. Radioactive 125-Iodine (125I), a low energy gamma emitter, was used to develop a novel in situ method for the radiolabeling of particles and investigation of their biodistribution. 125I-labeled particles exhibited high stability in saline and serum over the second day, which justified their use in the following in vivo studies.

The biodistribution of 125I-labeled particles after intravenous injection in rats differed significantly: HAp particles mostly targeted the liver, HAp/Ch the spleen and the liver, while HAp/Ch-PLGA targeted the lungs. Twenty-four hours post injection, HAp particles were excreted completely, while both 125I-HAp/Ch and 125I-HAp/Ch-PLGA were retained in the body for a prolonged period of time with more than 20% of radioactivity still found in different organs.",
publisher = "Elsevier",
journal = "Materials Science and Engineering: C",
title = "Investigating an organ-targeting platform based on hydroxyapatite nanoparticles using a novel in situ method of radioactive 125Iodine labeling",
pages = "439-436",
volume = "43",
doi = "10.1016/j.msec.2014.07.046"
}
Ignjatović, N., Vranješ Đurić, S., Mitić, Ž., Janković, D.,& Uskoković, D. (2014). Investigating an organ-targeting platform based on hydroxyapatite nanoparticles using a novel in situ method of radioactive 125Iodine labeling.
Materials Science and Engineering: C
Elsevier., 43, 439-436.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.msec.2014.07.046
Ignjatović N, Vranješ Đurić S, Mitić Ž, Janković D, Uskoković D. Investigating an organ-targeting platform based on hydroxyapatite nanoparticles using a novel in situ method of radioactive 125Iodine labeling. Materials Science and Engineering: C. 2014;43:439-436.
doi:10.1016/j.msec.2014.07.046.
Ignjatović Nenad, Vranješ Đurić Sanja, Mitić Žarko, Janković Drina, Uskoković Dragan, "Investigating an organ-targeting platform based on hydroxyapatite nanoparticles using a novel in situ method of radioactive 125Iodine labeling" Materials Science and Engineering: C, 43 (2014):439-436,
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.msec.2014.07.046 .
31
27
33

Routes and pathways to small particles based on hydroxyapatite

Ignjatović, Nenad; Vranješ Đurić, Sanja; Mitić, Žarko; Janković, Drina; Uskoković, Dragan

(Belgrade : Materials Research Society of Serbia, 2013)

TY  - CONF
AU  - Ignjatović, Nenad
AU  - Vranješ Đurić, Sanja
AU  - Mitić, Žarko
AU  - Janković, Drina
AU  - Uskoković, Dragan
PY  - 2013
AB  - Nanoparticles based on hydroxyapatite (NPs) have many useful physicochemical and biological
properties, such as easy preparation and modification, as well as biocompatibility, which make them suitable for transport and unloading of various pharmaceuticals. Hydroxyapatite
nanoparticles coated with bioresorbable polymers have been successfully used as carriers of
antibiotics and vitamins in bone tissue engineering. In this study, we have investigated the synthesis of nanoparticles of hydroxyapatite and hydroxyapatite coated with chitosan and the chitosan-poly-D,L-lactide-co-glycolide polymer blend. The influence of the processing technique on the structure and characteristics of the obtained particles was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), particle size distribution analysis (PSD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), zeta potential analysis (ZP) and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). In applied research, an appropriate radioisotope (Iodine-125) was selected and it was used to label particles. The in vivo biodistribution of 125I-labeled particles were studied in healthy Wistar rats following intravenous administration. The XRD, FT-IR and ZP analyses have confirmed that the hydroxyapatite particles with d50=72 nm are coated with chitosan and the chitosan-poly-D,L-lactide-co-glycolide polymer blend. 125I-labeled particles showed completely different behaviour in vivo: hydroxyapatite particles have the highest liver accumulation 10 min after injection but rapid excretion from the body without residual radioactivity 24 hours after injection; chitozan coated hydroxyapatite particles have the highest accumulation in the liver 10 min after injection with considerable amount (almost 50 %) retained 24 hours later; hydroxyapatite particles coated with the chitosanpoly-D,L-lactide-co-glycolide polymer blend have the highest uptake in the lungs 10 minutes after injection and moderate retention in the same organ 24 hours later.
PB  - Belgrade : Materials Research Society of Serbia
C3  - The Fifteenth Annual Conference YUCOMAT 2013: Programme and the Book of Abstracts
T1  - Routes and pathways to small particles based on hydroxyapatite
SP  - 7
EP  - 7
ER  - 
@conference{
author = "Ignjatović, Nenad and Vranješ Đurić, Sanja and Mitić, Žarko and Janković, Drina and Uskoković, Dragan",
year = "2013",
abstract = "Nanoparticles based on hydroxyapatite (NPs) have many useful physicochemical and biological
properties, such as easy preparation and modification, as well as biocompatibility, which make them suitable for transport and unloading of various pharmaceuticals. Hydroxyapatite
nanoparticles coated with bioresorbable polymers have been successfully used as carriers of
antibiotics and vitamins in bone tissue engineering. In this study, we have investigated the synthesis of nanoparticles of hydroxyapatite and hydroxyapatite coated with chitosan and the chitosan-poly-D,L-lactide-co-glycolide polymer blend. The influence of the processing technique on the structure and characteristics of the obtained particles was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), particle size distribution analysis (PSD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), zeta potential analysis (ZP) and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). In applied research, an appropriate radioisotope (Iodine-125) was selected and it was used to label particles. The in vivo biodistribution of 125I-labeled particles were studied in healthy Wistar rats following intravenous administration. The XRD, FT-IR and ZP analyses have confirmed that the hydroxyapatite particles with d50=72 nm are coated with chitosan and the chitosan-poly-D,L-lactide-co-glycolide polymer blend. 125I-labeled particles showed completely different behaviour in vivo: hydroxyapatite particles have the highest liver accumulation 10 min after injection but rapid excretion from the body without residual radioactivity 24 hours after injection; chitozan coated hydroxyapatite particles have the highest accumulation in the liver 10 min after injection with considerable amount (almost 50 %) retained 24 hours later; hydroxyapatite particles coated with the chitosanpoly-D,L-lactide-co-glycolide polymer blend have the highest uptake in the lungs 10 minutes after injection and moderate retention in the same organ 24 hours later.",
publisher = "Belgrade : Materials Research Society of Serbia",
journal = "The Fifteenth Annual Conference YUCOMAT 2013: Programme and the Book of Abstracts",
title = "Routes and pathways to small particles based on hydroxyapatite",
pages = "7-7"
}
Ignjatović, N., Vranješ Đurić, S., Mitić, Ž., Janković, D.,& Uskoković, D. (2013). Routes and pathways to small particles based on hydroxyapatite.
The Fifteenth Annual Conference YUCOMAT 2013: Programme and the Book of Abstracts
Belgrade : Materials Research Society of Serbia., 7-7.
Ignjatović N, Vranješ Đurić S, Mitić Ž, Janković D, Uskoković D. Routes and pathways to small particles based on hydroxyapatite. The Fifteenth Annual Conference YUCOMAT 2013: Programme and the Book of Abstracts. 2013;:7-7.
Ignjatović Nenad, Vranješ Đurić Sanja, Mitić Žarko, Janković Drina, Uskoković Dragan, "Routes and pathways to small particles based on hydroxyapatite" The Fifteenth Annual Conference YUCOMAT 2013: Programme and the Book of Abstracts (2013):7-7